Sisters of Charity Federation Archives

St. Joseph’s Free School and The Academy of Mount Saint Vincent, stained glass panels, 1810; 1859; 1943; 1972

Item

SCNY Stained glass panel #2.jpg

Dublin Core

Title

St. Joseph’s Free School and The Academy of Mount Saint Vincent, stained glass panels, 1810; 1859; 1943; 1972

Subject

Catholic schools
St. Joseph’s Academy (Emmitsburg, Md.)
McGowan’s Pass (Convent: New York, N.Y)
Academy of Mount St. Vincent on-the-Hudson (New York, N.Y.)
Academy of Mount St. Vincent (Tuxedo Park, N.Y.)
Central Park (New York, N.Y.) –Pictorial works
Bronx (New York, N.Y.) – Pictorial works
Schools –New York (State) –Tuxedo Park – Pictorial works
Schools – New York (City) – Bronx –Pictorial works

Description

Panel 1, upper section: Emmitsburg, Maryland, 1810:
In 1810 when Elizabeth Seton arrived in Emmitsburg, Maryland, the new community of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph’s, opened a free school, the two-story Federal-style building depicted, today known as the ‘White House.’ On February 22, 1810, three girls were the first day students to attend Saint Joseph’s Free School, the first free Catholic school for girls staffed by religious women in the country.
Panel 1, lower section: McGown’s Pass, Manhattan, 1847:
Mother Seton’s school in Emmitsburg was the precursor to the Academy of Mount Saint Vincent, Bronx, opened after the New York Sisters separated from Emmitsburg community in 1847. Under the patronage of Reverend John Hughes, the first Archbishop of New York and brother to Mother Mary Angela Hughes who led the Community 1855-1861, the Academy at McGown’s Pass was regarded as one of the pioneer institutions in the East for the education of Catholic girls. In 1851, the Academy received its charter from the New York State Legislature. McGown’s Pass at approximately 109th Street and 5th Avenue, had been the location of Revolutionary War headquarters for George Washington and his army.
Panel 2, upper section: Font Hill-On-Hudson, Bronx, New York, 1859
When the Sisters were asked to vacate the McGown’s Pass property in Manhattan for the planned development of Central Park, they purchased the 55-acre estate Font Hill-On-Hudson located on the east bank of the Hudson River. In 1859 when construction of the first building at Font Hill-on-Hudson was completed, the building included accommodations for the new Academy and boarding students. The classrooms, grand study hall, art room, music hall, reception rooms, as well as the Convent and Chapel of the Immaculate Conception were housed in this building, today known as Founders Hall.
Panel 2, lower section: Tuxedo Park, New York, 1943
As the College student population increased, the need for separate quarters for the Academy’s faculty, students, and activities, was addressed. To provide a new location for the school, Archbishop Spellman deeded an estate in Tuxedo Park, New York, that had been donated to the Archdiocese of New York by Mrs. E. John Heidseick. On this property, the mansion ‘Chastellux’ first housed the Academy of Mount Saint Vincent at Tuxedo Park in 1943. In 1947, the Academy expanded in acreage when Mr. Erasmus Lindley deeded his adjacent home and property.

Creator

Peter Appleton, Artist
A handwritten note recorded by Sr. Maria Lawrence Keating, who taught at the Academy of Mount Saint Vincent, Tuxedo Park, from 1948-1966, states that Mother Mary Fuller asked artist Peter Appleton, who designed the windows for the Tuxedo Park chapel to create these plaques to honor the tradition of the Academy.

Date

1859; 1947

Rights

Permission for reproduction or quotation must be obtained through written application to: Director of Archives, Sisters of Charity of New York, 6301 Riverdale Avenue, Bronx, New York, 10471. This permission is valid only insofar as he Archives of the Sisters of Charity of New York, as owner or custodian, has any rights in the matter and does not remove the responsibility of the author, editor, and publisher to guard against the infringement of any rights; including copyright, that may be held by others.

Relation

Panel 1; Panel 2

Format

stained glass

Language

English

Type

Physical Object

Coverage

1810; 1847; 1859; 1943
St. Joseph’s Academy (Emmitsburg, Md.)
McGowan’s Pass (Convent: New York, N.Y)
Academy of Mount St. Vincent on-the-Hudson (New York, N.Y.)
Academy of Mount St. Vincent (Tuxedo Park, N.Y.)

Citation

Peter Appleton, Artist A handwritten note recorded by Sr. Maria Lawrence Keating, who taught at the Academy of Mount Saint Vincent, Tuxedo Park, from 1948-1966, states that Mother Mary Fuller asked artist Peter Appleton, who designed the windows for the Tuxedo Park chapel to create these plaques to honor the tradition of the Academy. , “St. Joseph’s Free School and The Academy of Mount Saint Vincent, stained glass panels, 1810; 1859; 1943; 1972,” Sisters of Charity Federation Archives, accessed July 14, 2024, https://scfederationarchives.org/items/show/161.

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